Bringing a Dog to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival

And how to get that perfect pup pic.

Lizzie at the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival wearing  a bandana from Sassy Woof

Lizzie at the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival wearing a bandana from Sassy Woof

If you’ve been reading The Dapple for the past few months, you know that I’m completely obsessed with spring. I’ve been filling our apartment with pink peonies since January and am still counting down the days until I can ditch my wool coat.

Obviously, I was determined to go to the ultimate springy PNW event: Washington state’s annual Skagit Valley Tulip Festival, which is held every year in northern Washington. Farms across the Skagit Valley grow huge fields of daffodils and tulips, which all go into bloom in April each year—creating gorgeous views and lots of opportunities for the perfect selfie.

The Skagit Valley is an easy day-trip from Seattle—about 1.5 hours in the car—and the whole area really goes all out to celebrate spring. Roadside art exhibits open, local wineries host wine tastings, there are helicopter tours and bike tours, and (my favorite part) you can buy big bundles of paper-wrapped tulips for just a few dollars.

Many of the biggest farms at the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival aren’t pup-friendly, so bringing your dog can be a bit challenging. Scroll down to see our pictures and read our list of do’s and don’ts for bringing your dog to the Tulip Festival. 👇🏻

Bringing a Dog to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival: The Do's and Don'ts
Bringing a Dog to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival: The Do's and Don'ts
Bringing a Dog to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival: The Do's and Don'ts
Bringing a Dog to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival: The Do's and Don'ts
Bringing a Dog to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival: The Do's and Don'ts
Bringing a Dog to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival: The Do's and Don'ts
Bringing a Dog to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival: The Do's and Don'ts
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Do’s and Don’ts of Bringing a Dog to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival

  1. Don’t expect to bring your dog into the two biggest tulip farms, Roozengarde and Tulip Town. They’re fun to visit for humans, but don’t allow dogs.

  2. Do look for local homeowners selling parking next to the big farms in their own fields or driveways. Some of these offer a chance to stay out of the big farms’ no-dogs zones while getting a shot of your pup with the tulips. Just check with the owner that they don’t mind your dog.

  3. Don’t plan your trip for weekend afternoons. Traffic can get crazy and you’re better off going early in the morning or on a weekday.

  4. Do give yourself time to drive around and look for smaller farms that don’t have no-dogs policies—that’s where we took most of our pictures. The farmers rotate which fields have the tulips each year, so it can take a bit of searching to find them. The maps on the Tulip Festival website are a good start.

  5. Don’t forget that tulips are poisonous for dogs.

  6. Do bring cash to pay for parking—most places are $5 or $10.

  7. Don’t forget that you and your dog are guests on working farms. Keep your dog leashed and pack poop bags. (And, of course, water!)

  8. Do support local business by buying some tulips to take home—they’re the perfect souvenir!


Happy spring, everyone!

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